Adult Initiation

By Allen F. Roberts
University of California, Los Angeles (formerly University of Iowa)

Mali; Bamana peoples

Mask

Wood

H. 45.7 cm (18")

The University of Iowa Museum of Art, The Stanley Collection, X1986.210

Kore is the last and most significant of Bamana men's associations (Colleyn 2008). Hyena masks are performed early in Kore to urge initiands to control their passions, unlike the “insatiably greedy” hyena. This mask's sleek lines may reflect a Bamana aesthetic of “formal clarity which emphasizes rapid viewer accessibility” (McNaughton 1988: 109), yet Bamana “tend to be very situational in their... interpretation of images and symbols, preferring... to use specific events... as frames for their views on the meaning and quality of particular pieces” (McNaughton 1994: 33-4). The “formal clarity” of this mask must then provoke different interpretations because of its very openness of abstraction. The nature of the animal lends itself to such latitude of reference, for spotted hyenas are distinctly odd animals (Roberts 1995: 15-6) and readily provide apt metaphors for all that is immoral, rapacious, and senseless. These are human shortcomings left behind as Bamana men achieve the ranks of Kore.